fer1972:

Stormy Waves: Photography by Dalton Portella

Reblogged from FloresAlbert
Single Tree Grows 40 Kinds Of Fruit 


In an ongoing series on hybridizing fruit trees, Syracuse University sculptor Sam Van Aken’s Tree of 40 Fruit is true to its name. Most of the year, it looks pretty ordinary, but in the spring, the tree blossoms display various tones of pink, crimson, and white. Then, from July through October, it bears 40 different types of stone fruit, including almonds, apricots, cherries, nectarines, peaches, and plums. 
The feat is accomplished by grafting together several different varieties, including native fruit, heirlooms, and antiques, some of which are centuries-old, Aken tells Epicurious. 
His main source is an orchard at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, which he leased when he heard the orchard was to be torn down. After developing a timeline of when each of the 250 varieties blossom in relation to each other, he would graft a few onto the root structure of a single tree. When his “working tree” was about two years old, he would add more varieties onto the tree as separate branches — a technique called “chip grafting,” Science Alert explains. A sliver that includes a bud is inserted into an incision in the working tree and then taped in place. After it heals over the winter, the branch becomes just another normal branch on the tree, to be pruned as usual.

Read more at http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/single-tree-grows-40-kinds-fruit#5oLzqeAHBkfDjUll.99
Single Tree Grows 40 Kinds Of Fruit

In an ongoing series on hybridizing fruit trees, Syracuse University sculptor Sam Van Aken’s Tree of 40 Fruit is true to its name. Most of the year, it looks pretty ordinary, but in the spring, the tree blossoms display various tones of pink, crimson, and white. Then, from July through October, it bears 40 different types of stone fruit, including almonds, apricots, cherries, nectarines, peaches, and plums. 

The feat is accomplished by grafting together several different varieties, including native fruit, heirlooms, and antiques, some of which are centuries-old, Aken tells Epicurious

His main source is an orchard at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, which he leased when he heard the orchard was to be torn down. After developing a timeline of when each of the 250 varieties blossom in relation to each other, he would graft a few onto the root structure of a single tree. When his “working tree” was about two years old, he would add more varieties onto the tree as separate branches — a technique called “chip grafting,” Science Alert explains. A sliver that includes a bud is inserted into an incision in the working tree and then taped in place. After it heals over the winter, the branch becomes just another normal branch on the tree, to be pruned as usual.

Read more at http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/single-tree-grows-40-kinds-fruit#5oLzqeAHBkfDjUll.99

jedavu:

Photographer Climbs High Up in the Mountains to Capture Dynamic Landscapes

Photos by  Max Rive

Reblogged from Untitled
Reblogged from Meanwhile, in Colorado

so-few-words:

unamusedsloth:

Full video here.

they make it look so graceful

Tags: gif

ryanpanos:

Abstract Cities | Cvetelina Todorova

Reblogged from Plantsexual
Do not let your fire go out, spark by irreplaceable spark in the hopeless swamps of the not-quite, the not-yet, and the not-at-all. Do not let the hero in your soul perish in lonely frustration for the life you deserved and have never been able to reach. The world you desire can be won. It exists…it is real…it is possible…it’s yours.
— Ayn Rand (via liberatingreality)
Reblogged from Feminerds - Talzir
angry-comics:

hello friends!! if you’re going to see welcome to night vale at san diego comic con, they will have these exclusive posters i designed for the event and other super cool merch! this was so fun to draw because i love this scene so much. check it out if you are there have fun ok thank you

angry-comics:

hello friends!! if you’re going to see welcome to night vale at san diego comic con, they will have these exclusive posters i designed for the event and other super cool merch! this was so fun to draw because i love this scene so much. check it out if you are there have fun ok thank you


From Astronomy Picture Of The Day; July 8, 2014:
Iridescent Clouds over ThamserkuOleg Bartunov
Why would a cloud appear to be different colors? A relatively rare phenomenon known as iridescent clouds can show unusual colors vividly or a whole spectrum of colors simultaneously. These clouds are formed of small water droplets of nearly uniform size. When the Sun is in the right position and mostly hidden by thick clouds, these thinner clouds significantly diffract sunlight in a nearly coherent manner, with different colors being deflected by different amounts. Therefore, different colors will come to the observer from slightly different directions. Many clouds start with uniform regions that could show iridescence but quickly become too thick, too mixed, or too far from the Sun to exhibit striking colors. The above iridescent cloud was photographed in 2009 from the Himalayan Mountains in Nepal, behind the 6,600-meter peak named Thamserku.

From Astronomy Picture Of The Day; July 8, 2014:

Iridescent Clouds over Thamserku
Oleg Bartunov

Why would a cloud appear to be different colors? A relatively rare phenomenon known as iridescent clouds can show unusual colors vividly or a whole spectrum of colors simultaneously. These clouds are formed of small water droplets of nearly uniform size. When the Sun is in the right position and mostly hidden by thick clouds, these thinner clouds significantly diffract sunlight in a nearly coherent manner, with different colors being deflected by different amounts. Therefore, different colors will come to the observer from slightly different directions. Many clouds start with uniform regions that could show iridescence but quickly become too thick, too mixed, or too far from the Sun to exhibit striking colors. The above iridescent cloud was photographed in 2009 from the Himalayan Mountains in Nepal, behind the 6,600-meter peak named Thamserku.

Reblogged from Nevertheless